More Evidence Linking Urban Design With Health Outcomes

The Globe and Mail cites a new study released this week in the Archives of Internal Medicine which found that people who live in neighborhoods that had physical activity amenities and healthy food options were 38% less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.  The same authors published a study last year looking at the same issue with regard to insulin resistance and had similar results.

Photo: Yo Ghurt
Photo: Yo Ghurt

As the evidence piles up linking sprawling, automobile-centric, urban design with poor health outcomes,  you wonder when policymakers are going to start linking public health concerns with efforts underway to reduce carbon emissions and improve air quality.  All of these environmental factors result in negative outcomes in numerous policy areas.  Sensible land use reform and smart planning could possibly be a crucial step in solving a host of social problems with a single policy intervention.